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20121201
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, but the tip of the iceberg on terms of what was on iewfer for -- offer for non-fiction. >> host: bob, same question. >> guest: right. it was a big year for dead presidents. caro's, the fourth of probably five volumes on lyndon johnson, just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a general figure in 20th century american history. also, goodwin's book "team of rivals," published in 2005 is back on the best seller list thanks to steven spielberg's movie, "lincoln," and on our list, it's number 20, remarkable for a serious book that's been out for so long. also, john's biography of thomas jefferson. just when you think there's no more to be said, someone writes a popular, read readable, somewhat controversial book. >> host: hard to mention dead presidents and not mention "killing lincoln" and "killing kennedy" both best sellers. >> guest: bill and his writing partner, martin. i introduced bill about his process. o'riley says the partner does the research, and he does the writing. he has the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academicceps. you have to trust him wher
and which bob hagerty will autograph after the program. i am the president fellow at a e. i. and we are pleased to have you with us to consider this fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae i thought i knew a lot about this subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance in this country and also about the vivid personalities involved over the last 40 years, all the way to the end of the story, at least it is the end so far. the book is full of information but in addition if you read my invitation to this event you know i think it represents an underlying tragic drama. in fact a shakespearean tragedy in five's. rise, power, hubris, fall, and other humiliation. on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was th
marketplace, bob minzesheimer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today". sarah weinman, let's start with you. give us your general assessment of 2012 for the book industry especially when a comes to nonfiction books and what are one or two nonfiction books you want to talk about? >> let me start by saying 2012 was a very eventful year in the book publishing world between publishers consolidating the department of justice, doing five publishers and apple on e-book pricing and later into the program, amazon expanding its publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those alone account for a substantial portion of publishing news. on the non-fiction side it was a very strong year. in particular we are seeing a lot of best of 2012 lists dominated by behind the beautiful forevers which was winner of the national book awards. we had robert caro's latest volume in his ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew sullivan's are from the free which was recently published. >> host: hundred page compendium looking at different child-rearing examples of
weinman is the news director for "publishers marketplace" and bob minitz heymer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today." .. publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those olympic first stage apportion of bush publishing news. on the nonfiction front is a very strong year. in particular receipt of the best of 2012 list dominated by the likes of catherine coos behind beautiful forever is the witch was the winner of the national book award. the ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew solomon's fire from the tree, only recently published over 900 each companion he had the king of different child-rearing examples of special needs children. so these two books on a very substantial books, but they're the tip the iceberg of nonfiction. >> host: minzesheimer, same question. >> guest: it was a big year for dead presidents. she remember robert harris is the fourth of five on monday june 10, which was just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a secret 20th century history. dirt since goodman spoke spoken a team of riva
. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a study in general washington during the siege of the national park service. he saw soviet about doing good count watchman at the boston massacre, the way the encrypt these in 1765 in the towns celebration. ask them about the crazy event annually. he has lectured on many historical societies, including this one. thought --
to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unparalleled experience. as president kennedy said to david herbert donald one day, the great historian, donald comes in, there's been one of those rankings of presidents come out. kennedy didn't like it, and he said no one -- he pointed at his desk -- he said no one has a right to judge nip, even poor james buchanan who hasn't sat at that desk and seen what he's seen and dealt with what he's dealt with. [laughter] so, and i think there's a lot to that. on the louisiana purchase, the louisiana purchase led to the first really sustained secession thinking and movement in american history which was new england, because new england saw the
, the 63rd annual. [inaudible conversations] >> now joining us here is bob minzesheimer. i'm going to get you over here. you have the better light. i don't need to worry about that. how important are the national book awards in your view? >> well in the book world? very important. probably not quite as important as the pulitzers, but they're second to the pulitzer's, the most prestigious award, and they're trying to make them more of a cultural phenomenon. look the booker award thursday britain. >> do you comment on the finalists? >> well, i did -- i've always believed -- this is a strange thing. in britain, the bookies -- betting is legal in britain, and bookize set odd on the booker awards. we have nothing like that. and i thought, we should. try to make books more part of the popular culture. so my two predictions -- and i'm guessing because the judges or five people. each panel is five judges. five predictions that kevin powers, who has written a debut novel set in iraq, yellow bird, will be an upset in fiction, and an sold standby, robert caro, who has been on chance many tames, his
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
, bob dylan, and juno via. geoffrey kloske, please. [applause] >> thank you so much for holding the summit. for the future of the book, a future that has, as we have discussed, a future that is very much always in doubt. one thing that i always do is read the headline about the publishing from "the new york times" read and i quizzed them is when they think those were written. there are things like editors and edits and being published and the decay of our book culture and our intellectual culture and so forth. can find them in different forms. the fairly similar forms almost every decade for the last 100 years. but publishing is a melancholy industry for some reason. we are always in a fallen age. i have been doing it for 20 years, and the golden age ended right before i showed up. [laughter] and it really went in high swing, depending on the age of the person telling the story. [laughter] but it has always been the case. the spirit of not quite being what they used to be. which is amazing, because when you show up everyday and we do it again and we publish new books and get exc
, into the treasury and funds development in eastern congo. bob hormats, undersecretary of state in the administration could be a kind of person who could help spearhead that, as someone who has helped build this public-private alliance that involves companies and the united states government and civil society, trying to help us promote responsible investment, spurred on by 1502 from the dodd-frank law. conclusion, my bottom one is this, two sentences. a credible internationally driven peace process that deals with the root causes and includes broader eastern congo civil society, both absolute to guarantee peace, but its absence, however, absolutely guarantees war. thank you very much. >> thank you very much indeed. mr. dizolele? >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, thank you for the invitation to testify before your committee. i come before you as a congolese and u.s. consensus and. the views expressed today, the statements are mine and mine alone. this important hearing comes as yet another critical time for the democratic republic of congo, and i'd like to commend you for your interest in my hom
that story to another bob warner coach. >> i actually, a mother giving a 9-year-old a wax and give so he could make his weight at 9 years old -- just as a point of personal privilege i have to tell you i have gotten over my grudge, i may vikings fan. i was not upset when he retired four years ago. i have gotten over it. >> that is why you have been so successful. >> 40 years is all it takes. >> i haven't gotten over losing the browns in baltimore. but 40 years might do it. with that, we now go -- i want to get this just right, mr. quigley who was here at the start. >> thank you, mr. chairman. those watching this note that the house has a long history of having hearings about performance enhancing drugs in sports, some of unfairness, some of them infamous. what struck me in looking at this meeting was it used to be major league baseball was behind. now is the only major sport testing for 8 g h. sandwich feet and lb association and the commissioner can agree on this it makes no sense to me that national football league can't as well. i want -- anybody on the panel wants to help, the way yo
counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to come about to write this book. >> good afternoon. i would like to thank the committee on law and national security for giving me the opportunity to work on this book project. if he told a couple of years ago , i was still at college that soon thereafter are be working gun national security policy book, would have told you were crazy. i have been to a number of committee events in the past and i often hear panelists described that only now we seem national-security will really come into its own separate field and seeing enterprises like welfare in national security loan center will reviews and journals popple ball
to grammar school now? or the case of telling that story to another bob warner coach that came by, and he said that's nothing big. i actually caught a mother giving a 9-year-old a laxative so he could make his weight at 9 years old. >> wrestling, that happens for sure. as a point of personal privilege, i got over my grudge against you. growing up in south dakota, i was a vikings fan, and i was not upset when you were retired in 73, but that was 40 years ago, and i got over it. >> that's probably why you've been so successful. >> thanks. [laughter] >> forty years is all it takes. [laughter] you notice i have not got over losing to the browns to baltimore, but 40 years might do it. >> with that, we now go next to -- i want to make sure we get this just right, mr. quigley who was here at the start. >> thank you, mr. chairman. those watching this know that the house has a long history of having hearings about performance enhancing drugs in sports. what struck me is it used to be that major league baseball was behind, and now it's the only major sport tested for hgh. if the mlb association an
-- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament members who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacceptable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aggravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-olds receive minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyone over 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to be less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cut
for broad conversation. so with that let me know who is here with us the chief staff to governor bob macdonald and from the state of oklahoma where she is the chief of staff to governor mario and at the end, roxanne white joining us from the great state of colorado where she is the chief of staff to governor john hickenlooper. they are all professionals in their career. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and then we will come down this way. >> thank you for the report. it provides a good framework for all of us to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform and colorado. our pension is about 69% solvent. we did a major reform in the last administration and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%, and so to give you a sense of how far they were beyond the state if the battle was whether or not the state has a right to ratchet down the cola for our state employees that we could see the need to go to 25% compensation by 2020, so it's very important that we are able to give you the litigation in terms
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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